CATALOG | PORTFOLIO | PURCHASING COOPS | MANUFACTURERS | GRANTS/FUNDING | SUBMIT ORDER | FAQ

Education FAQ

  1. I have my PC connected to my projector, but nothing shows on the screen.
  2. I see an image on my projector screen, but it doesn't look right.
  3. I have a Hitachi projector. How do I reset the filter hours?
  4. How do I connect a document camera to my computer?
  5. Please explain all these acronyms: DLP, LCD, HDTV, EDTV, XGA, SVGA.
  6. Do you provide on-site training?
  7. Do you provide regular maintenance on projectors?
  8. How can I place an order?
  9. Something is broken. Who do I contact?

 


 

  1. I have my PC connected to my projector, but nothing shows on the screen.

    First things first:

    1. Check that both devices are getting power.
    2. Check that your cables are securely connected.
    3. Check that there is light coming from the projector lens.
    4. Check that the projector has the correct INPUT (input 1, 2, 3, 4) selected.
    5. On your PC, press and hold the function key (Fn) and then press F5. Make the selection that allows you to see the PC image on the screen.

    If you continue to have trouble, you might need to go into your computer's desktop settings to enable a dual-monitor setup. If you still have trouble and your in-house technologist is not able to assist you, please call your representative.

  2. I see an image on my projector screen, but it doesn't look right.

    1. Check your graphic settings and resolution. Consult the projector manual to determine screen resolution capabilities and make the appropriate adjustments.
    2. You might need to go into your computer's desktop settings to enable a dual-monitor setup.

    If you still have trouble and your in-house technologist is not able to assist you, please call your representative.

  3. I have a Hitachi projector. How do I reset the filter hours?

    1. With the projector running, press the MENU button to open the menu.
    2. Choose "OPTION" on the menu using the UP/DOWN buttons, then press the RIGHT button or ENTER button.
    3. Choose "FILTER TIME" using the UP/DOWN buttons, then press and hold either the RIGHT button on the projector or the RESET button on the remote control for 3 seconds.
    4. Choose "RESET" using the UP button.

    If you still have trouble and your in-house technologist is not able to assist you, please call your representative.

  4. How do I connect a document camera to my computer?

    Using the LUMENS DC133

    1. Connect COMPUTER VGA OUT to DC133 VGA IN
    2. Connect DC133 VGA OUT to PROJECTOR VGA IN

    Using the LUMENS DC160

    1. Connect COMPUTER VGA OUT to DC160 VGA IN
    2. Connect DC160 DVI OUT to DVI/VGA CONVERTER and from there to PROJECTOR VGA IN

    If you still have trouble and your in-house technologist is not able to assist you, please call your representative.

  5. Please explain all these acronyms: DLP, LCD, HDTV, EDTV, XGA, SVGA.

    VGA

    A video standard that allows for resolutions up to 640x480 with up to 16 colors at a time. It also allows for 320x200 resolution with 256 colors. Many older computer games were written to take advantage of the 320x200 resolution because of the comparatively high color depth. SVGA and XGA replaced VGA, but VGA compatibility remains an important part of most graphics cards. If your video driver is corrupted, versions of Windows since with 95 and NT let you go in under VGA mode to fix your graphics driver.

    SVGA

    Short for Super VGA, a set of graphics standards designed to offer greater resolution than VGA. SVGA supports 800x600 resolution, or 480,000 pixels. The SVGA standard supports a palette of 16.7 million colors, but the number of colors that can be displayed simultaneously is limited by the amount of video memory installed in a system. One SVGA system might display only 256 simultaneous colors while another displays the entire palette of 16.7 million colors. The SVGA standards were developed by a consortium of monitor and graphics manufacturers called VESA.

    XGA

    (eXtended Graphics Array) A screen resolution of 1024x768 pixels. The term stems from IBM's XGA display standard introduced in 1990, which extended VGA to 132-column text and interlaced 1,024x768 resolution with 256 colors. Later, XGA-2 added non-interlaced 1,024x768 with 65,000 colors.

    LCD

    Short for Liquid Crystal Display, a type of display used in digital watches and many portable computers. LCD displays utilize two sheets of polarizing material with a liquid crystal solution between them. An electric current passed through the liquid causes the crystals to align so that light cannot pass through them. Each crystal, therefore, is like a shutter, either allowing light to pass through or blocking the light. Monochrome LCD images usually appear as blue or dark gray images on top of a grayish-white background. Color LCD displays use two basic techniques for producing color; passive matrix is the less expensive of the two technologies. The other technology, called thin-film transistor (TFT) or active matrix, produces color images that are as sharp as traditional CRT displays, but the technology is more expensive. Recent passive-matrix displays using new CSTN and DSTN technologies produce sharp colors rivaling active-matrix displays.

    Most LCD screens used in notebook computers are backlit, or transmissive, to make them easier to read.

    DLP

    Short for Digital Light Processing, a new technology developed by Texas Instruments used for projecting images from a monitor onto a large screen for presentations. Prior to the development of DLP, most computer projection systems were based on LCD technology which tends to produce faded and blurry images. DLP uses tiny mirrors housed on a special kind of microchip called a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD). The result is sharp images that can be clearly seen even in a normally lit room.

    HDTV

    Short for High-Definition Television, a new type of television that provides much better resolution than current televisions based on the NTSC standard. HDTV is a digital TV broadcasting format where the broadcast transmits widescreen pictures with more detail and quality than found in a standard analog television, or other digital television formats. HDTV is a type of Digital Television (DTV) broadcast, and is considered to be the best quality DTV format available. Types of HDTV displays include direct-view, plasma, rear-projection, and front-projection. HDTV requires an HDTV tuner for viewing, and the most detailed HDTV format is 1080p.

    * HDTV Minimum Performance Attributes
    • Receiver: Receives ATSC terrestrial digital transmissions and decodes all ATSC Table 3 video formats
    • Display Scanning Format: Has active vertical scanning lines of 720 progressive (720p), 1080 interlaced (1080i), or higher
    • Aspect Ratio: Capable of displaying a 16:9 image
    • Audio: Receives and reproduces, and/or outputs Dolby Digital audio

    EDTV

    Short for Enhanced Definition Television, EDTV is a common name for a particular subset of the DTV (Digital Television) standards, but is considered to be specifically a part of the HDTV format. EDTV offers advancements over SDTV, but not near the quality and performance of HDTV. On a large display screen, EDTV only simulates HDTV viewing quality. EDTV operates as 480p (where 480 represents the vertical resolution and p represents progressive scan). To take advantage of the 480p standard, you must use a video source that outputs that signal (i.e. a DVD player) and the display must be able to read the 480p input signal. EDTV also offers the benefits of Dolby digital surround sound.

    * EDTV Minimum Performance Attributes
    • Receiver: Receives ATSC terrestrial digital transmissions and decodes all ATSC Table 3 video formats
    • Display Scanning Format: Has active vertical scanning lines of 480 progressive (480p) or higher
    • Aspect Ratio: None Specified Audio: Receives and reproduces, and/or outputs Dolby Digital audio
  6. Do you provide on-site training?

    To setup a training session, all you need to do is contact your representative. If you do not have one or do not know who your representative is, please call our office and ask to speak with our sales department.

  7. Do you provide regular maintenance on projectors?

    Yes. We have performed installations where there are over 100 projectors in a school -- and every single projector needs maintenance. We can service each projector and track lamp and filter hours and change them accordingly so that we can prevent irreparable damage to the unit.

    To get your school setup on a recommended maintenance plan, please contact our office and ask for the service department.

  8. How can I place an order?

    Please call your sales representative. If you do not have a sales representative, please call our sales department at 800-256-2754.

  9. Something is broken. Who do I contact?

    Call our office at 800-256-2754 and ask for the service department to report your trouble, or submit a service request online.

  
k